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is happening and the u.s. embassy represents the symbol of america as a people and government so people, the demonstrators, had a loud voice and as a government, it's our responsibility as the government of egypt we protected the embassy. we do not condone any attack against any embassies or any guests. this is a part of our principles and culture and what our religion orders us to do. >> rose: so the united states government and egyptian government are friends, not enemies? >> ( translated ): we are not enemies, of course. >> rose: you're our friends? >> ( translated ): for sure we are friends. >> rose: allies? >> the u.s. president said otherwise. >> rose: i know he did. but i'm asking the egyptian president. do you consider the united states an ally? >> ( translated ): this is depending on the definition of an ally. we have a real partnership in the interest and we want to achieve the interest of the world and to participate in many issues-- diplomatic, political, economical-- exchange of expertise in several areas. so the understanding of an ally as a part of a military alliance thi
also need to have a better governance of the whole, not only of the parts. and this is happening month after month because the european union as a whole is improving. >> rose: and then the foreign miminister of france, laurent fabius. >> we have to fulfill our role, and today we do not. but if this massacre continues, i think, first, it will have terrible effects on the region. and maybe-- well, our principle, as evidence saying, is to comply with the international legal rules. but the time comes where the human pressure is too strong. and maybe the time is coming. >> rose: in order, it may be a time that you have to act, even though you cannot get security council approval? >> it could be. you know when you have such massacre, you cannot say never. >> rose: mario monti, and laurent fabius when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications >> tonight a special edition of charlie rose. >> rose: mario monti is here. he is the prime minister of italy. he is also a senator for life, and until last july he was italy's minister of economy and finance. but he is not exactly a polit
, a syria that is united and inclusive where children don't need to fear their own government. and they have a say, sunni's and christians. that's what america stands for, that's what we will stand for sanctions and consequences to those who persecute and support for those who work for the common good. >> rose: they have the resolution to increase the government three times. meanwhile the killing in syria continues. they're up to 30,000 estimated dead. the impasse is just one of the many strains on relations between russia and the united states. iran is another is the dis trust over nato's defense shield. earlier this month the u.s. agency of the international development to lead russia. i'm pleased to have sergey lavrov back at this table, welcome. >> thank you very much, nice to be back. >> rose: u.s.-russia relations. >> yes, i believe we agree that these relations should be promoted. when president obama came to the whitehouse, he and his team assessed the relationship between moscow and washington and suggested what they call the reset of those relations which we suppor
global initiative, business and government and ngo s were in attendance to talk about big ideas, big problems. one of the problems they talked about at both places was syria. another was middle east protest about a film that attacked mohammed and the third was iran and nuclear weapons. we begin with the former president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to win but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as oppose
government was elected three months ago, a government forcing through yet another round of punishing spending cuts. in a country where one in four are already unemployed, perhaps one shouldn't be surprised the public anger at times tips over into violence. the morning had seen tens of thousands march on parliament demanding the government change course. they know it's hopeless, of course, their leaders are deep in negotiations with europe and the i.m.f. about cutting wages and pensions by anything up to 30%. and this in a city where already one in three businesses has closed. >> we have to do something for our future to have a regular job, to have a family. >> all of europe should have a voice against these policies. >> reporter: there will be little reassurance of promises of no more cuts after these. >> there is no scope for any further reductions in wages and pensions beyond this specific package. this is a commitment that the government has made. >> reporter: the greeks have been told that before. >> yes, they have been told that before. but should the government not meet that commitment,
. teachers protested here against cuts. they came onto the street at the government's announced the most severe round of budget savings so far. these latest austerity measures are widely seen as paving the way for a full-scale bailout. >> [spending -- speaking spanish] >> the minister of finance said he heard 2012 would be the last year the economy would shrink. another minister described it as a crisis budget designed to exit the crisis. this austerity budget aims to find savings of 40 billion joerres next year. each government department would how to make cuts of 90%. public-sector pay will be frozen for another year, and the retirement age is set to rise. >> just a few weeks ago, europe believed it had achieved a breakthrough. the european central bank said it would help come -- countries like spain by buying their bonds and reducing their borrowing costs. but there was a catch, spain would have to apply for a rescue and it would be strict conditions. but spain has resisted accepting conditions imposed from outside. part of the strategy behind today's budget was to adopt tough measure
of what a definition of prevention, a goal to which both governments agree what a definition would be in practice. >> woodruff: i was reading today there was disagreement inside netanyahu's own government that the israeli foreign ministry concludes that the economic sanctions are hitting iran hard calling for another round of economic sanctions. is that significant? >> the economic sanctions are hitting iran the iranian economy is in trouble and the reason why we haven't seen results with regard to the iranian negotiating position is that the p 5 plus 1 has not put on the table anything in the way-- the united states and the other five powers that have been negotiating have not put on the table significant sanctions related-- basically no sanctions relate other than the airplane parts. >> here i disagree with paul very much. the economic sanctions have been a wonderful success and an abysmal failure. they've been a success at raising the economic cost to the iranians but if their real goal is to compel the iranians to change the nuclear policy they've had no visible impact. so that
of government under the constitution. did congress exceed its law-making powers under the constitution when it enacted the health care law? what role do state governments have in enforcing immigration laws? this term a lot of the questions either on the docket or pending, whether the court will take them, really involve equality issues. issues arising under the equal protection act. >> brown: affirmative action is on the docket. >> it is. it's going to be argued next week. it involves the university of texas and whether it can use race as a factor in its admissions policy in order to increase diversity within its student body. >> brown: we're definitely going to look at that next week. but pending, as you say, as you used the word, same sex marriage. >> yes. there are seven petitions that have been filed in the court but they really break down into two cases. first, challenges involving the federal defense of marriage act, a key provision defines marriage for all federal purposes as between a man and a woman. and then the second set involves california's proposition 8. that proposition bann
spent by the british government to protect you? >> first of all, it was not as extreme it. i had to shoulder some of the costs. there is a view of all of these government safe houses. i was never offered a government safe house. it was up to me to find a place tuesday. that made them very expensive. and i remember once saying to one of the police officers, supposing "the satanic verses" are not generating the kind of revenue -- suppose it was a poem. if he were protecting a poet with the kinds of funds that poets and normally have, what would you do? -- that poets would normally have, what would you do? and he said, we did not know that. anyone in britain who has been a target would be protected. sovereignty. tavis: you talk about what it felt like to be in hiding, and it brought on your feelings of shame and ashamed. >> i think it is humiliating to be put in a corner, is essentially locked up, and told, "and not talk, because he will make things worse." i felt it as a humiliation. it took me awhile to somewhat break those chains and begin to fight back, to begin to argue back, a
world over and american maid video. it also calls for the end of assad's government in syria and would do all it could. jeremy has more. >> in the motorcade pulled into the united nations headquarters as the secretary general was sounding the alarm. he said it was a time of turmoil, transition, and transformation. for americans right now, that means protests about the anti- muslim film produced in this country. three of his colleagues were killed and one of the protests. the president told the general assembly that no words could excuse the killing of innocents. >> more broadly, it also speaks to the need for all of us to honestly address tensions between the west in the world bettas moving towards democracy. let me be clear. as we can solve every problem in the world, the united states has not and will not dictate the outcome of a democratic transitions. >> with strong feeling and a new era of democracy, it's not as if they can. the protests have made the middle east and issue only six weeks away. with accusations that president obama approach has been weak. president obama could stil
angry at the new round of severe government cutbacks. author j.k. rowling reveals her new book and her regrets about writing to of her most famous novel so quickly. >> there were times when it was really tough, and i read them and i think, maybe i will go back and do it over. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. two massive bomb blast have shaken the syrian capital today setting the military headquarters of light. bombs and bullets are not the only weapons in this war. we heard firsthand evidence of rape being used to emulate and a great victims -- used to humiliate victims. graphic attacks are taking place. >> is just one of the many roads along which they fully. these are among the quarter of a million refugees of syria's war. they bring with them a handful of belongings and stories of crimes that haunt the survivors. this woman said she was arrested at a checkpoint and later repeatedly raped, along with three other women. >> a daily rape took place in front of the other girls. that was the time that would remove the blindfolds so that the girls could see
of the highest. >> many of these workers face redundancy. the government says growth will return next year. others say the government has missed an opportunity to reduce state spending and make it easier to hire and fire workers. today's budget hearing reflects a deeper unresolved problem with the eurozone. as we have seen, other countries like spain and greece have been struggling to reduce spending even while their economies are weak or in recession. >> and other things europeans might envy in brazil, they have so much money in the government that response to the slowdown is a stimulus package that has been announced. in other news, ahead of britain posting a financial watchdog has announced a reform to the setting of libor, the benchmark interest rate. the review was commissioned after a fine was imposed on barclays for trying to rig the rate. now to nepal where a plane has crashed killing all 19 people on board. the aircraft caught fire within two minutes before taking off. it is the second fatal accident this year and once again the country's safety record is in the spotlight. >> a jo
over the years. there's two main categories they have. one is how to reduce the size of government, and the other half of it is this model legislation that's in the corporate good. in other words, there's a profit driven legislation. how can you open up a new market? how can you privatize something that can open up a market for a company? and between those two divisions you are kind of getting to the same end goal which is really kind of ultimate privatization of everything. >> mark pocan is something of an expert on alec. in fact, to learn as much about it as he could, he became a member. >> what i realized is if you join alec for a mere hundred dollars as a legislator you have the full access like any corporate member. >> he also took himself to an alec conference for a first-hand look. >> hi, i'm state representative mark pocan. welcome to my video blog. i'm outside the marriott on canal street in new orleans at the alec convention, american legislative exchange council. that was where you watch the interaction of a room full of lobbyists-free drinks, free cigars, wining, dining
, savings, and why the government cannot stop it. >> the prices of food, cheese, butter, milk and even fruit have witnessed an increase of 10% in the last two weeks. people are complaining about that. they are publicly complaining about this situation and they blame the situation on a ahmadinejad. >> today, he put the blame on western sanctions. >> it is very clear, iran is being pressurized. there are sanctions from the enemy telling other nations not to buy iranian oil. this is a secret war. the enemy thinks that with these sanctions, they can defeat iran. they cannot. it is a psychological war. "you can see how much trouble the currency is in. in a week, it has lost 1/3 of their value. what is the cause? as we heard, president ahmadinejad's critics say that he is to blame for bad management. he seemed to agree with the west, that finally there sanctions are beginning to have a real impact. in the last year, the oil exports have roughly halved at as a result of sanctions. would it slide toward economic collapse and bring about the outcome that the west would like? >> hardship might make pe
: violence erupting this week in spain and greece over government austerity measures are reminders the european debt crisis is far from solved. today, spain unveiled its 2013 budget, promising more big budget cuts as the government tries to reduce its heavy deficit. as turmoil and tension in the euro-zone escalates, there remain questions about the longevity of the euro currency. today, italian prime minister mario monti said he doesn't think any country will leave the union. erika miller reports from new york. >> reporter: as italian prime minister mario monti left today's event, he dodged reporters and walked straight to a waiting car. earlier at the forum, it was a different story. calm, cool and collected, monti stayed carefully on message. he made it clear italy is better ofas part of the european union. >> the euro brought to italy a single currency, shared with all the others, that is very important economically. >> reporter: monti also emphasized the benefits of the common currency for other member countries, like germany. >> thanks to the euro, germany was able and is able
of increased government regulation that went into effect a year ago. frost started looking for ways to simplify fees five years ago. its basic account carries a $5 monthly fee. but like many banks, if the account balance is above a certain level, the fee is waived. >> we have found that this account that i just described to you is excellence at a fair price. we give the quality service and it's a fair price and we have found that our customers embrace it. >> reporter: evans puts the cost of new bank regulation on the industry at $13 billion, a cost that's being passed on to consumers. according to a new survey by bankrate, the percentage of free checking accounts offered by banks continues to drop, only 39% of non-interest checking accounts are available to all customers free of charge, that's down nearly 50% in the past three years. other banking fees are also on the rise: >> we continue to see pretty steady increases in the old standbys. things like atm fees and overdraft charges but even with regard to checking accounts. not only are more accounts charging fees now because of the decline in
of the governments that have supported the opposition into one big category as foreign conspirators. this is a regime that has lost control over enormous parts of its territory over the last 18 months. much of its officer corps has defected. it has failed to suppress the revolution. it has lost control over major urban centers. it's very much on the defensive and this is its way of striking back i think by targeting every government that supports political change in syria as supporters of terror. >> now, you're working very closely with various members of the opposition. there's been a lot of drift simple that they lacked unity. we're not quite sure who they are yet. do you think that they're ready for government yet? >> there is still a significant level of competition and conflict within the syrian opposition. but on a number of issues, including the kind of post-assad future that the opposition is fighting for. we find significant convergence across different spectrums of the opposition that was evident in the work we did with them, it's evident in the work the group that the arab league has spons
of i am going to put my country on the map, one thing we do is you have to have government. when there is a problem you fix it with government, so we made sure we address the issue and fixed it. tavis: you did not allegations you were personally profiting from the situation. >> it was ludicrous the idea or the perception or the thought , but my second book is going to be called, they tried to j. edgar hoover me. before there was me, there were many that were set up in different ways, and i do not want to get into that right now. tavis: there are some americans who have a real problem with people coming in from other countries and constantly waving their flags. you see it in boxing matches. you see it on the streets in protest where people are waving the flag of their home country, and some americans get really angry of that, and you are one of those immigrants who has been very proud about wearing the haitian flag, waving it. what do you say to americans who say if you love your country that much, stay there, but all that flag-waving in this country of other flags, you say what t
, education, et cetera, bring them together with business, bring them together with government, both at the national or and at the sub national level and really collaborate intensely to come to a solution. >> rose: we continue this evening with matt damon and gary white, they are cofounders of water.org. >> and i heard these statistics that were jaw dropping about a child dying every 20 seconds because of lack of access to clean water and sanitation, that is, that to me is just staggering, because -- because to relate to that as an american, i mean, we don't know people who are thirsty, it just doesn't happen, right? you know, with away don't know kid who die from diarrhea. >> rose: water is ubiquitous. >> yes, of course, or cholera for that matter, just clean water. so, you know, so that was one side of it, just the mindless death and bono talks about stupid death, you know, because it is preventable. >> we have known how to make water safe for more than 100 years, right? imagine we discovered the cure for aids today, and 100 years from now 3.5 million people are still dying becau
's the first responsibility of governments to control the mobs, to essential... they have the obligation to keep diplomatic missions safe. and there's always going to be things that people aren't going to like. but at the end of the day, people in these societies have delegitimize violence and essentially say no matter how much you disagree with what someone says or writes, it does not give you the right to go out and cause violence. if they do, you the governments have to stop it. that's your obligation under various international charters, under the united nations. i think that's an important message for the world to hear, an important message for the egyptian government to hear. >> ifill: nick burns let's talk about two sticky points when it comes to foreign policy: iran and syria. in both cases in the speech he said we need to speak out against it whether it's assad leaving or syria stopping the slaughter of its own people but he didn't outline exactly what the u.s. would do next about that. that's what some of his critics have said he has come up short on. >> well, it's a real probl
? >> yes, indeed. >> rose: how about governance? >> honestly speaking, we still have problems and challenges when it comes to governance and the international community has committed itself to assisting the afghan government in capacity building so that the afghan government can provide basic services to the afghan people and step up the fight against corruption, etc. i had a talk with president karzai recently and he agreed that we must give top priority to that. and actually he has taken some measures to fight corruption. >> rose: and he's leaving-- there's a new election in 2014. he will be departing, we assume. >> yeah. and it's for the afghans to elect their leadership. but let me add to this that we have actually seen progress in the development of afghanistan. the economic growth is around 7% to 8% annually from low level, but it's quite impressive. more people have access to electricity. we see flourishing markets. the educational system has improved. eight million children go to school. more than one-third are girls. 30% of teachers are female teachers. the health sit
rates, business is beginning to boom for many home builders. the government says in august americans purchased new homes at a seasonally adjusted rate of 373,000. that was down slightly from july, but up nearly 28% from august of last year. subkowiak thinks many buyers were hoarding cash during the recession and are now eager to spend it on new homes on signs the overall economy is improving. but that increased demand has brought more competition for lots. >> now you have end users who are buying for themselves, you have other builders who are doing spec homes, so lot prices have gone up significantly in the last ten months. >> reporter: new home prices are also rising. the commerce department said last month alone they were up more than 11%. but while this is all good news for an economy that hasn't had much of it lately, morningstar economist robert johnson says the market still has to make up a lot of lost ground. >> if you look at housing starts at the peak we were over two million starts. i'd say based on population the number should have been about a million and a half. now we'
, but not on any resolution to the scheduled tax increases in government spending cuts. the nonpartisan tax policy center figures taxeses will go up by almost $3500 per household next year if certain tax cuts are allowed to expire. the report says 90% of households would see higher federal taxes. you can learn more about the fiscal cliff and why it matters, go to our website: www.nbr.com. nokia is on track to team up with major software-maker oracle. the finnish cell phone company is giving oracle access to its mapping services. financial details of the deal were not disclosed. but the move comes as nokia recently signed mapping deals with groupon, and amazon. last week apple's c.e.o. apologized for the shortcomings of its new map service. >> susie: and american express has agreed to pay millions of dollars in refunds to settle accusations from regulators that it deceived customers. the violations include: unlawful late fees, misleading consumers about debt collection, and age discrimination. amex will pay more than $100 million in fines, and give payouts to about 250,000 customers. consumers that
the financial crisis is another. and the growing government debt. that said, i mean i wouldn't underestimate the upside with the u.s. being such a creative economy. for example, energy prices have fallen a lot. and there are some other things you can count to on the upside. but so far businesses have been very reluctant to invest heavily, very reluctant to hire heavily. >> muhamed el-erian what do you see-- when you look at all this data coming in, what is most important to you? >> a few things. first the employment picture. and not just whether we're creating jobs or not. that's important. but also what's happening to those who remain unemployed. and that is a pretty worsening picture. that's why i call 2 a crisis. because long-term unemployment is really high. and youth unemployment is really high. and these are longer-term issues that we need to deal with. so the employment picture is very important. second, clarity for businesses. today no one has the confidence to invest. there is a ton of money, judy, on the sideline, a ton of money. and if we can engage that money in the system would
in significantly more costs and regulation and who would want to invest in a fund that the federal government has designated as systemically important? >> reporter: new rules may also push cash into unregulated investments or bank accounts. >> and putting even more money into the banking system and more burdens onto its insurance system seems to me the opposite direction from the way we want to be going when we are trying to solve the too big to fail problem. >> reporter: during the financial crisis, the treasury was forced to guarantee money market funds, a risk it doesn't want to take again. darren gersh, "nightly business report," washington. >> tom: u.s. stocks ended their best quarter today since 2010, despite some weakness today. investors locked in profits today after another set of disappointing economic data. a measure of business activity in the midwest fell to 49.7 in septmber from 53 in august, the first such contraction in three years. and a national gauge of consumer sentiment slipped to 78.3, after registering 79.2 earlier in the month. meanwhile, spain's banks got a passing grade
segment. three focus on the economy, four, five, and six health care, the role of government and governing. procedure, each candidate gets two minutes to respond to a question posed by jim lara. time remaining is given to freewheeling discussion of segments. risk factor, dangerous, sometimes lethal. ♪ [music] ♪ >> are you better off than you were four years ago? is it easier for you to go and buy things in the stores than it was four years ago? is there more or less unemployment in the country than there was four years ago? is america as respected throughout the world as it was? do you feel that our security is as safe, that we're as strong as we were four years ago? if you answer all of those questions yes, why then i think your choice is obvious as to who you'll vote for. if you don't agree, if you don't think that this course that we've been on for the last four years is what you would like to see us follow for the next four, then i could suggest another choice that you have. >> jimmy jimmy carter practical gagging. question, who will win the debate on tuesday? can romney pull a rea
of homs, as government troops target rebel bastions. >> one-and-a-half years after it began and the battle for this city and for syria grinds on relentlessly. the bombardment of hommes. the war here is as intense as ever. >> ifill: as world leaders gather in new york for the annual meeting of the united nations general assembly. margaret warner gives us a preview. >> woodruff: will new genetic findings reshape the treatment of breast cancer? we ask dr. harold varmus, head of the national cancer institute. >> ifill: and ray suarez kicks off american graduate week with a conversation with three now- successful people who know exactly what it's like to want to drop out of high school. >> sometimes we give up on kids too soon. sometimes we want to teach to the test instead of teaching to transform. sometimes that comes from top-down policies. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: soon computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailore
center for al-shabab, the group that's fought somalia's internationally backed government for years. al-shabab is allied with al- qaeda, but the militants now have been driven out of all of somalia's major cities. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the men at the top of the presidential tickets hunkered down again today for debate preparation, ahead of the big meeting tomorrow night. but they also managed to break away briefly-- president obama for a visit to the hoover dam, and governor romney out with an aide to buy lunch, a burrito. meanwhile, their running mates made multiple stops in key states. vice president biden told a crowd in charlotte, north carolina that mitt romney would raise taxes on most americans to fund tax cuts for the wealthy. >> how they can justify raising taxes on the middle class has been buried the last four years. how in lord's name can they justify raising their taxes with these tax cuts? look, folks, we've seen this movie before. massive tax cuts for the wealthy. eliminating restrictions on wall street. let the banks w
for -- i am going to dodge that question because i am not looking for a government job. this is a very straightforward but. i would be alienating some people. i decided it was more important to get the facts on the table so people could understand there were different perspectives and it could have been avoided and it can still be fixed if main street voters need to rise up and make this an issue. tavis: iraq -- a fact that you wrote it. -- i appreciate the fact that you wrote it. the book is called "bull by the horns." that is our show for tonight. thank you for watching. as always, keep the faith. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with jeffrey sachs. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completeliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmarcommitted $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunge
program. and a european central bank member said his agency would not help restructure greek government debt. also weighing on stocks today, high anxiety about third-quarter earnings. u.s. corporate profits have outpaced the broader economy since the end of the great recession, but profits warnings yesterday from caterpillar, and recently from intel, fedex and burberry, suggest the boom in earnings is finally beginning to fizzle. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at how the numbers are shaping up for third quarter and beyond. >> reporter: the start of reporting season for corporate america is still two weeks away, but already on wall street, the worrying about profits is heating up. and it sounds like investors have good reason to be nervous. after all, analysts predict companies in the s&p 500 will see earnings drop an average of 2% in the third quarter. if that happens, it will be the first such decline in three years. tough comparisons are partly responsible, as last year's third quarter was one of the best ever. on top of that, however, global demand remains weak. >> i think we're j
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)